IBPS PO English Language Questions with Answers Practice online test 28

Description: free IBPS PO English Language Questions with Answers Practice test 28 for IBPS PO Preliminary and Main online test Prepare bank PO banking mock exams adda

1 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Which of the following is true with regard to women professionals who worked in corporate offices in the past?

(A) They were considered as most privileged women and special treatment was given to them.
(B) They had to suffer in silence because of male dominance and fear of losing jobs.
(C) They were given special perks and leave facilities.
A.  Only (A) B.    Only (B)
C.  Only (C) D.    Only (A) and (B)
E.    Only (A) and (C)
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2 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
What is the main intention of the author behind quoting the recent case of Tejpal?
A.  To establish that Tejpal is an honest man and has whole-heartedly confessed his misconduct B.    To show that Tejpal initially could not understand the gravity of the case
C.  To prove that women have become more courageous to lodge a complaint against a man, however powerful he may be D.    To make it known that Tejpal has thoroughly been a controversial man
E.    None of these
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3 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
What is the opinion of a UP politician, as mentioned in the passage regarding the employability of women?
A.  That women should be given equal job opportunity as men B.    That it is not proper to employ women in offices
C.  That in most of the cases of shameful instances, women are more responsible for the event than men, and hence they should not be employed in public offices D.    Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environment.
E.    Only 3) and 4)
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4 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Find the correct statement(s) regarding woman professionals employed in the corporate world at present

(A) Their number has increased significantly and now they are in a position to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly.
(B) They are still not willing to expose issues related to sexual harassment and take the culprit down the legal path of justice.
(C) A large number of women working in corporate offices are holding top positions these days.
A.  Only (A) B.    Only (B)
C.  Only (C) D.    Only (A) and (B)
E.    All (A), (B) and (C)
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5 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
What was/were the outcomes of the PIL filed by the women's right group Vishaka?
A.  The rape victim ultimately got justice and was gladly accepted by her community. B.    The Supreme Court laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual assault at the workplace
C.  The Supreme Court directed the employers to form an independent redressal committee D.    Only 1) and 2)
E.    Only 2) and 3)
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6 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Which of the following statements is not true from the facts mentioned in the given passage?
A.  Over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered between 2009 and 2012 B.    In the year 1973 the rate of conviction was forty four per cent
C.  In comparison to 1973 there is a surge in conviction rate in 2012 D.    The statistics of reported rape cases show that women have been denied justice
E.    None of these
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7 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/ group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

Q: . Tormentor
A.  fugitive B.    colleague
C.  offender D.    manager
E.    companion
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8 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/ group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

Q: Backdrop
A.  attack B.    general situation
C.  violence D.    reaction
E.    reaction
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9 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/ group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

Onslaught
A.  outbreak B.    opposition
C.  drive D.    assault
E.    thought
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10 . Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions

In the past, the few women professionals who dotted our corporate landscape suffered in silence, not willing to complain about discrimination or harassment for fear of losing their jobs. Today, there is strength in numbers and women are willing to raise issues of gender discrimination and sexual harassment publicly. Although women have greater confidence, financial independence, strong peer groups and a deeper understanding of their rights, they are still reluctant to expose issues related to sexual harassment and to take their tormentors down the legal path of justice. There exists, unfortunately, a huge psychological challenge that women, and society as a whole, need to address. This relates to behavioral attitudes and codes of conduct in the workplace.

It was in 1997 that a women's rights group called Vishaka filed a PIL in the Supreme Court in response to a humiliating legal battle fought by a rape victim in Rajasthan, who did not get justice and was shamed and ostracised by her community instead. Consequently, the Supreme Court's Vishaka judgment laid down guidelines for employers to deal with complaints of sexual harassment/assault at the workplace, which included the formation of an independent redressal committee.

If one looks at the statistics of reported rape cases, it is obvious that women have been denied justice. Between 2009 and 2012, over one lakh cases of rape and molestation were registered, but, sadly, the convictions declined from 44 per cent in 1973 to 24 per cent in 2012.

Against this backdrop, the alleged sexual assault case involving the former editor-in-chief of Tehelka, Tarun Tejpal, has yet again revealed, the ugly truth of how women are victimised in their workplaces. Worse still, Tejpal initially confessed to misconduct, and then retracted once he realised the gravity of the case. The victim, on the other hand, has courageously steered the matter on a legal course and is now braving the onslaught of allegations and tirades from Tejpal's camp. 'Why did you ride the elevator with Tejpal for a second time?' is one such ridiculous question. Inane comments such as these, about such serious matters, are what undermine the status of women in our society. Another outrageous comment came from a UP politician who now questions the employability of women. Such irresponsible utterances must be condemned if we are ever to build an equitable and modern society. The anger and outrage expressed this time has reached a critical decibel level and needs to be channelled into positive change. We cannot allow our attention span to be so short. We must act swiftly and surely to ensure that the Vishaka guidelines are implemented by every organisation. Women must be empowered and provided a safe working environ ent.
Choose the word/group of words which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word/ group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

Q: . Ostracised
A.  included B.    survived
C.  excelled D.    overtook
E.    exceeded
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